Supreme Court of Ohio RSS Feeds

Below is a list of RSS feeds available from the Supreme Court of Ohio. This list is updated each time a feed is added to this Web site. To subscribe to a feed, simply copy the link below the feed to which you want to subscribe and paste it into your RSS reader.

Chief Justice Maureen O'Connor (information about the activities of Chief Justice O'Connor)
http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/rss/justices/oconnor.xml

Justice Paul E. Pfeifer (information about the activities of Justice Pfeifer)
http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/rss/justices/pfeifer.xml

Justice Evelyn Lundberg Stratton (information about the activities of Justice Stratton)
http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/rss/justices/stratton.xml

Justice Terrence O'Donnell (information about the activities of Justice O'Donnell)
http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/rss/justices/odonnell.xml

Justice Judith Ann Lanzinger (information about the activities of Justice Lanzinger)
http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/rss/justices/lanzinger.xml

Justice Robert R. Cupp (information about the activities of Justice Cupp)
http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/rss/justices/cupp.xml

Justice Sharon L. Kennedy (information about the activities of Justice Kennedy)
http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/rss/justices/kennedy.xml

Daily Case Announcement (description of the actions taken by the Supreme Court on cases)
http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/rss/cases/dailyannouncement.xml

What is RSS?

RSS (Really Simple Syndication or Rich Site Summary) is a format used to deliver Web content directly to the user without the user having to repeatedly visit the Web site from which the content originates.

Why RSS?

The primary advantages to using RSS are the timely delivery of desired content and the convenience of having content from a variety of Web sites available in a single location.

How Does RSS Work?

Information is delivered to RSS subscribers via an RSS reader. There are many free desktop readers available for download from the Internet. Additionally, Web sites like Google and Yahoo have readers built into their sites which can be used by simply signing up. Below are basic instructions for using the Google and Yahoo readers.

Google

  1. Go to reader.google.com
  2. Create a Google account by clicking on the "Create an account" button
  3. Click on the “Create an account now” link located just below the account sign-in box in the right column
  4. Once you have created an account and are signed in, click on the "Add a subscription" button
  5. Paste the URL of the RSS feed into the text field and click the "Add" button

Yahoo

  1. Establish a “MyYahoo” page by going to http://www.yahoo.com and clicking on the “MyYahoo” link in the upper left portion of the page
  2. On your “MyYahoo” page, click on “Add Content” located at the top of the left column
  3. Click on “Add RSS feed" link
  4. Paste the URL of the RSS feed into the URL field
  5. Click the “Add” button

The primary advantage to signing up for a Web-based reader is the ability to check your favorite feeds from any location that has an Internet connection. Whereas a desktop reader can only be accessed from the computer running the reader software.

How Often Will I Receive Updated Content?

How frequently new items appear in an RSS reader depends on how often the RSS feed to which you have subscribed is checked for new content by the reader you are using. Web-based readers, like the ones built into Yahoo and Google, are updated anywhere from once an hour to once a day, depending on the popularity of the feed to which you have subscribed. How frequently desktop readers check a feed for new content is usually configurable by the user. A desktop reader will typically update faster than larger, Web-based reader services like Google and Yahoo, which have more users to service. A desktop reader only handles the feeds to which you subscribe.